Kent County Presents Spreading the News During the War of 1812 on March 7.

The War, a newspaper covering the War of 1812.

Press Release – The Kent County Historical Society

Please join us this Friday, March 7, from 4 to 6 PM for History Happy Hour.  This month’s speaker is Mike Dixon who will talk about “Spreading the News During the War of 1812 on the Chesapeake.”   Wine and cheese will be provided, courtesy of Sandy and Steve Frohock.

See you on Friday at the Bordley History Center, corner of High and Cross Streets, Chestertown.

 

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White Gold on the Delaware Bay — Documentary Examines History of Oystering in Delaware

A new Delaware video, “White” Gold, shares the story of oystering in the First State.  In the 65-minute production, the documentarian takes a careful look at how maritime communities such as Leipsic, Little Creek, and Bowers Beach prospered on the abundant harvests of Delaware Bay oysters, commonly called white gold.  “Stately wooden schooners piled Delaware Bay, dredging as many as 900,000 bushels annually” at one time, but today the harvest is limited to less than 15,000 bushels.

Looking at the past and the present, “White Gold” shares interviews with local captains, residents of the communities, and scholars about the changes that have occurred and how the bay-shore communities and the commercial waterman who built them have endured.  Dr James Valle, Delaware State University (retired) commented that he was always interest in maritime history and when he arrived in Kent County it didn’t seem like there was anything here.  But as he started to investigate he discovered that there had once been a very large fleet of oyster boats working out of the coastal villages.  Little by little as he dug into the past at the Delaware Archives and other place the story slowly unfolded and he found that those villages had prospered because of this connection.   Throughout the product, Michael Oates, the digital storyteller, includes the account of one couples attempt to keep some of the history alive by restoring the oyster schooner Maggie Myers.

This document was produced by “302 Stories,” a digital storyteller sharing the story of Delaware’s people and places. It was partially underwritten through a grant provided by the Delaware Humanities Forum.

It is an informative documentaru so check it out sometime when you are visiting the library.  We learned about this thanks to the always helpful staff at the Corbitt Calloway Library in Odessa.

Chart of the Delaware Bay and River, 1866 by Fielding Lucas:  Source:  www.oldmapsonline.org, the David Rumsey Collection

Chart of the Delaware Bay and River, 1866 by Fielding Lucas: Source: http://www.oldmapsonline.org, the David Rumsey Collection

 

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Title Provides Glimpse of African-American History in Talbot County, From Slavery to Modern Era

Roll of the Reg. United States Colored Troops, Slave showing recruitments from Talbot County. Source:  Maryland State Archives, COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASURY (Bounty Rolls)

Roll of the Reg. United States Colored Troops, Slave showing recruitments from Talbot County.
Source: Maryland State Archives, COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASURY (Bounty Rolls)

A Talbot County title published in 1981 came to my attention this week and I spent a few hours late Saturday evening reading some of the chapters.  “Praise the Bridge That Carries You Over:  The Life of Joseph Sutton” by Shepard Krech, III presents the life of an African-American farm laborer and waterman from the Eastern Shore.

Sutton was born in a former slave community in 1885 and during some 80-hours of interviews, this book opens a window to 19th and 20th Century life on the mid-Shore, from the perspective of an African-American born in Copperville, a hamlet in Miles River Neck.  He died in 1980 at the age of 95 and is buried beside Saint Stevens African Methodist Episcopal Church in Unionville.

Professor Krech, an anthropologist, says it is an attempt to show the history of “common black folk on Maryland’s Eastern Shore from slavery to the mid-twentieth century.”  It begins with interviews about what Sutton learned from tradition-bearers about African-American in the Civil War, slavery, family-relationships, and the community in postbellum years up to his birth.  The pages progress through Sutton’s life and continue until near the time of his death.   The lifelong resident of the Eastern Shore was 93 years old when he competed the interviews and he died two years later, in 1980.  Suttons’ recollections include descriptions of slavery, details of his childhood in the 1890s and commentaries on his life experiences during the era of segregated life on the Shore.

Considering that Sutton’s long life spanned the period of the immediate aftermath of the slavery and Reconstruction-period to modern times, this title adds valuable transgenerational perspectives, opening yet another window for us to understand long ago eras.

I will have to return the book shortly, but today I’m ordering a copy for my library, from one of the out-of-print book services.

1866 Martenet's Map of Talbot County, showing Miles River Neck.  Source www.oldmapsonline.org, the David Rumsey Collection

1866 Martenet’s Map of Talbot County, showing Miles River Neck. Source http://www.oldmapsonline.org, the David Rumsey Collection

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On the Old Baltimore and Harford Turnpike

February 22, 2013 — On a sunny Saturday in February traffic moves smoothly along on the main portion of the Baltimore and Harford Turnpike.  The legislature authorized construction of the Turnpike in 1816 and it had two branches.  One took travelers through “Belle Air” to the Susquehanna at Rock Run. The upper route went to a Susquehanna Bridge at McCall’s Ferry in Pennsylvania.

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The Baltimore and Harford Turnpike on a sunny Saturday in December.

map 1860

A part of “The new war map of Virginia, Maryland & Pennsylvania,” 1860. Published by B. B. Russell. Source: Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library.

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“The Bloodhound Law: the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850,” to be Examied by Woolford in Talk at Bear Library

What:  The Bloodhound Law:  The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850

Where:  New Castle County Library, 101 Governor’s Place, Bear, DE.

When: 2:00 p.m., Sunday, March 23, 2014

Cost: Free

Newark native, historian Syl Woolford returns to the Bear library to discuss the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. 

 

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Susquehanna Museum Presents Camay Calloway Murphy Lecture Feb. 20

Announcement from the Susquehanna Museum

Please join us on
Thursday, February 20, 2014 at 7 pm
for a special lecture by
Camay Calloway Murphy.

Mrs. Murphy, an educator, playwright, author, arts advocate, and daughter of jazz musician Cab Calloway, will speak about her life experiences and her latest works.

Event Location: Havre de Grace City Hall (711 Pennington Avenue), Havre de Grace, MD.

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The B & O Railroad Station in Havre de Grace

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The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Station in Havre de Grace about 1910. In addition to the B & O, the town was served by the Pennsylvania Railroad.

This is a postcard of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Station in Havre de Grace, about 1910.

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